Return on Design Investment: Learning from Las Vegas

Lighting design is undergoing a quiet revolution, leading to new architectural and interior designs while providing enhanced intrinsic benefits for the designer’s clients, the client’s employees and the client’s customers.

Restaurant-withLights-2

Nowhere has the science of design and its financial return been more thoroughly scrutinized than Las Vegas. Steve Wynn and his designer Roger Thomas have turned casino design on its head. According to Karen Finlay, a researcher of gambler behavior and professor at the University of Guelf, Thomas’ designs create a space of “refuge” and mental “restoration” which served to reduce gambler stress levels.

As conceived by Wynn and Thomas, the Bellagio’s casino represented a $1.6-billion bet on human psychology. The gamble paid off: the Bellagio generated the largest profits for a single property in Las Vegas history. And this income wasn’t a by-product of scale—the Bellagio was less than half the size of the MGM Grand—but a direct result of the way that Wynn’s guests spent money. Per guest room, the resort generated four times as much revenue as the Las Vegas average. (1)

There are numerous studies on environmental features used to manipulate human senses. For instance, light and color are two variables that can directly affect behavior. Colors are closely associated with various moods. Red is “exciting” and “stimulating”, blue is “comfortable”, “secure” and “soothing”, orange can create “angst” and green is “ecological” and “leisurely”. Color also affects physiological reactions such as pulse rate, breathing rate, and arousal. When it comes to gaming research, it has been shown that people will tend to take greater risks when exposed to red light, but much less so when colors veer towards the blue end of the spectrum.

However, what is done in Vegas doesn’t have to stay in Vegas. In fact, to create similar levels of ambience is becoming easier and more commonplace. Imagine being able to show a concrete Return on Design Investment (RODI) through an effective mix of color and lighting; designs that allow your clients to control the specific ambience of their business at any time? Imagine being able to create refuge and places of mental restoration for employees within their place of employment, or a place where customers desire to purchase more. What would the impact be?

(1) Wired Magazine: The Psychology of Casinos

http://www.wired.com/2012/03/the-psychology-of-casinos/

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Pick Red!

As we leave the month of February, Valentine’s Day, and National Wear Red Day (www.goredforwomen.com) behind us, let’s not forget the color red has more personal associations than any other. Red is the symbolic color of the heart and the rose and closely associated with romantic love.

INTERESTING TIDBITS REGARDING THE COLOR RED

Red Intensifies Physical Reactions
According to a new Study published in the journal Emotion, seeing red causes people to react faster and more forcefully. According to the author of the study, Andrew Elliot of the University of Rochester, bodies react to red, a culturally ingrained signal of danger, as if we’ve seen a threat (quoted by MSNBC). The typical reaction isn’t long lasting and people are not even aware that it occurs. However, many studies by different psychologists suggest that activities in which a brief bursts of strength and speed is needed, red may have an impact.

According to Eva Heller (from the book, Psycholgie de la couleur – effets et symboliques)
Red is the color that most attracts attention. Surveys show it is the color most frequently associated with visibility, proximity, and extroverts.

Other studies have shown that red stimulates energy and can increase blood pressure, respiration, heartbeat, and pulse rate. The color Red also tends to increase confidence and encourage action.

Red Makes Men More Desirable to Women
In a separate study conducted by Elliot (cited above), men in red are “more attractive, more powerful and more sexually desirable to women,” (quoted by CBS News). Separate research has found that men also find women in red more attractive because the color suggests “sexual receptivity.”

Red Tends to Stimulate Appetite
For this reason, red is often used in many restaurant settings.

When Focus and Concentration are Required, Red is Shown to Have a Negative Impact
Numerous studies concerning productivity indicate red can have a significant negative effect. In another study by Elliot (University of Rochester) and researchers from the University of Munich, they determined that seeing “even a hint of red” on an exam can negatively affect a test-taker’s performance “to a significant degree.”

Red is Stimulating and Exciting
Red is uniquely recognized as stimulating, exciting, and the amount of red is directly related to perceived energy levels. In design, red is utilized to draw attention and the shrewd use of red as an accent can immediately focus attention on a specific element.

The Roman God of War
Red is the color of blood and of revolution. It is associated with sacrifice, danger and courage. In Roman mythology red is associated with the god of war, Mars.

Red Sky
Red is always the top color of a rainbow (ROY G BIV). Interestingly, we see red at sunrise and sunset because the path of the sunlight through the atmosphere to the eye is longest, whereas the longer wavelengths of blue and green are scattered, rendering them invisible.

Feng Shui
In China, Red is the color associated with luck and happiness. The art of feng shui advocates painting the front door of a home red to summon prosperity for its residents.

Fruits and Vegetables
According to Registered Dietitian and Professor Lona Sandon, “There are many red fruits and vegetables to choose from and they each bring something a little bit different to the table,” (cited in WebMD). Many red fruits and veggies are loaded with powerful, healthy antioxidants — such as lycopene and anthocyanins — that may do everything from fight heart disease and prostate cancer to decrease the risk for stroke and macular degeneration (the leading cause of blindness in people aged 60 and older). Antioxidants soak up damaging free radicals.

Fruits
Red Apples
Blood Oranges
Cherries
Cranberries
Red Grapes
Pink/Red Grapefruit
Red Pears
Pomegranates
Raspberries
Strawberries
Watermelon

Vegetables
Beets
Red Onions
Red Peppers
Red Potatoes
Radishes
Radicchio
Rhubarb
Tomatoes

Bees don’t Pollinate Red Flowers
Bees can’t see the color red, though they do see all other bright colors. Interestingly, red flowers are usually pollinated by birds, butterflies, bats, and wind, rather than bees.

Do You Drive a Red Vehicle? (from: http://psychicjoanne.com/hub/What-the-Colour-of-Your-Car-Says-About-You)

It has been said that a person’s vehicle tells more about their personality than any other personal object. If you own a red car, then you are associated with danger, excitement and speed. Red is an exciting colour that embodies vitality, fun, ambition and achievement.

Red gives off a high energy vibration that has been found to raise the blood pressure and stimulate the senses, and those who own and drive red cars may be inclined to take more risks than others. While red cars don’t necessarily go any faster than any other car, the owners of Red cars are most often the ones trying to get ahead of the pack.

Those who choose to drive a red car often resonate with high-action, sex appeal, moving quickly and being flashy.

A red car can indicate a passionate person who likes to take charge of situations, and who at times can seem a little ‘wild’. Red car owners are not afraid to get things done.

Red cars denote those who have ‘high performance’ energy and drive, and who are full of zest, courage, ambition and verve. They can be impatient characters who live their lives at a fast pace. People who drive red cars are often enthusiastic about life and are passionate about their interests and themselves.

Those who drive a red car can be described as being extroverted and ‘out there’. They have a ‘go-getter’ type of personality and enjoy adventure and action.

Those who drive red cars are ‘take charge’ kinds of people who like to get things done quickly and efficiently.

Red car owners can be impulsive and aggressive and can be prone to emotional ups and downs in quick succession.

Physically aggressive types of people will be attracted to a shiny red car.

Bright red subconsciously sends others the message that the owner is in a high income bracket.

Burgundy gives a similar message, but is less obvious.

SONGS WITH RED IN THE TITLE:

  • Flowers are Red – Harry Chapin
  • In Red Square – Al Stewart
  • Lady in Red – Chris de Burgh
  • Little Red Riding Hood – Sam the Sham and the Pharoahs
  • Little Red Rooster – Rolling Stones
  • Little Red Wagon – Miranda Lambert
  • Ol’ Red – Blake Shelton
  • One More Red Nightmare – King Crimson
  • Panama Red – New Riders of the Purple Sage
  • Red – Sammy Hagar
  • Red Camaro – Keith Urban
  • Red Dirt Road – Brooks and Dunn
  • Red House – Jimi Hendrix
  • Red Lipstick – Rhianna
  • Redneck Friend – Jackson Browne

IDIOMS UTILIZING THE WORD RED:

  • Take a red eye (overnight flight)
  • A red herring (something used to distract from the subject/topic at hand)
  • A red-letter day (important day)
  • To be in the red (owe money)
  • Paint the town red (celebrate, usually with too much to drink)
  • Red carpet (lavish, treatment of honor)
  • Red blooded (energetic)
  • Red hot (exciting)
  • Cut through the red tape (overcome excessive rules and regulations of beauracracy)
  • Red in the face (suffer embarrassment or shame)
  • Red as a beet (red in the face, typically from embarrassment)
  • Caught red-handed (catch someone doing something wrong)
  • See Red (to be angry)

MOVIES WITH RED IN THE TITLE:

  • Reds
  • Woman in Red
  • Red Heat
  • Red Dawn
  • Red Riding Hood
  • Red
  • Red Planet
  • The Hunt for Red October
  • The Thin Red Line
  • Red Dragon
  • Red Planet
  • Where the Red Fern Grows
  • Three Colors: Red
  • The Red Balloon
  • The Red Violin

PEOPLE WHO USE THE NAME RED OR HAVE RED AS A NICKNAME

  • Stacey Farber (Nickname: Red)
  • Ariana Grande (Nickname: Little Red)
  • Red Buttons
  • Red Skelton
  • Floyd “Red Crow” Westerman
  • Redd Foxx
  • Conan O’Brien (Nickname: The Big Red)
  • Reba MacIntyre (Nickname: Big Red)
  • Sinbad (Nickname: Red)
  • Red Barber
  • Red Auerbach
  • Red Holloway
  • Red Adair
  • Red Allen
  • Erik the Red
  • Manfred von Richthofen (Nickname: The Red Baron)
  • Michael Schumacher (Nickname: The Red Baron)

SAYING RED IN ANOTHER LANGUAGE

  • Armenian: karmir
  • Bulgarian: cherven
  • Chinese: Hóng
  • Croation: crvena
  • Czech: červený
  • Dutch: rood
  • Filipino: pula
  • Finnish: punainen
  • French: rouge
  • German: rot
  • Greek: kókkinos
  • Hungarian: piros
  • Indonesia: warna merah
  • Italian: rosso
  • Japanese: Aka
  • Korean: ppalgan
  • Malay: merah
  • Mongolian: ulaan
  • Polish: czerwony
  • Portuguese: vermelho
  • Russian: krasny
  • Spanish: rojo, colorado
  • Swahili: nyekundu
  • Swedish/Danish/Norwegian: rod
  • Turkish: kırmızı
  • Vietnamese: đỏ

A FEW TEAMS THAT CHOSE RED FOR UNIFORMS

  • Baseball: Cincinnati Reds, California Angels, Philadelphia Phillies, St. Louis Cardinals
  • Basketball: Houston Rockets, Chicago Bulls. Toronto Raptors, Atlanta Hawks
  • Hockey: Detroit Red Wings, Calgary Flames, Arizona Coyotes
  • Football: Kansas City Chiefs, San Francisco 49ers, Arizona Cardinals
  • Soccer: Olympiacos (Greece), Arsenal (UK), Manchester United (UK), Beyer Leverkusen (Germany), AC Milan (Italy)
  • Universities: Alabama, Harvard, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Stanford, Wisconsin
  • National Teams: Austria, Canada, China, Cuba, Switzerland, Turkey

CORPORATE BRANDS & LOGOS

  • Lellan (shameless plug)
  • Coke
  • Red Bull
  • Oracle
  • Budweiser
  • Verizon
  • Nescafe
  • H&M
  • ESPN
  • Kellogg’s
  • Canon
  • Nissan
  • Kia Motors
  • ExxonMobil
  • Lego

If you know of any other interesting information about the color red, please post them in the comments section.

An Unimportant, Important First for this Year’s Super Bowl

Though I didn’t watch it, the first Super Bowl I recall was Super Bowl III. I was eight. As the game approached, the older girls (high school) in the neighborhood were increasingly fawning over Joe Namath. He was single, and a little rebellious. His hair flowed, while Unitas and Morrel had flat tops. He was cocky, but likable, especially among the 15-25 year-old female demographic.

Namath

Some of the girls didn’t even know what the Jet’s colors were (many TVs were still black and white). Since it was a time before the proliferation of professional sports jerseys in malls across the country, the Namath’s admirers used green markers and hand printed the number twelve on white t-shirts. Nearly 42 million people watched that Super Bowl. And after the underdog Jets and “Broadway” Joe beat the highly favored Baltimore Colts, his status as a Sports and Social icon grew. The girls were giggly for weeks.

We’ve come a long way over the last XLIX years. This year, the Super Bowl will be watched by an expected 184 million people and the cost of a thirty-second commercial will approach $5 million. Moreover, the Patriot v Seahawk game on Sunday will showcase an unimportant, important first.

In addition to . . .

the game . . .

the commercials, and

the half-time show . . .

For the first time ever, fans will see the Super Bowl in a stadium recently reconfigured with LED lighting. There will be a noticeable improvement in brightness and clarity for players and fans alike, and a far smaller energy footprint, which translates to a huge operational savings for the University of Phoenix Stadium.

The new LED system provides nearly double the light on the field as the old system, but will only require 310,000 watts to do so.  Additionally, calculations expect the LED system to last 35 – 50 times longer.

University of Phoenix Stadium Lights

Kudos to the folks at Ephesus Lighting of Syracuse, NY who designed the new lighting system. The focused beams of LED light will create a more uniformly lit field; reducing glare and unwanted shadows. Fans will see much more. Ultimately, it will create a better experience, for those on the field, in the stadium and even for those watching on TV.

Now, on to the game. Enjoy it. I’m looking forward to a well played game, rooting for neither (or both) depending on your perspective.

 

2015: The International Year of Light

Pondering the Dawn 001

If you take a moment to consider the concept of light, you quickly realize that it is perpetual; it was, is, and will be. It has the power of life and the subtleness of a single star glimmering among millions across a midnight sky. In the haste of daily routine, each of us is guilty of taking it for granted; rushing past its revelations. But, there are moments of appreciation when light stops us in our tracks, inspires us, awes us.

From the stretching rays of the dawn rising over the horizon to the ordered symmetry of rainbows; from the deep magenta hues of sunset to the brilliance of lightning flashes across a dark, moonless sky.

Light has the ability to initiate mood and influence behavior. It passes through our moments and permeates our reality.

We contemplate creation in the misty luminescence of a fog shrouded forest, and romance when dining over a whimsically flickering candle.

It is fast, impactful, dynamic. We are reminded daily of its relevance in art, business, science, and spirituality.

It is captured, if only for a moment, by painters and photographers. At the quantum level, it is the basis for the modes of modern communication. In the end, light is the miracle of time itself.

Village on Water 001So, in this year of Light, take a moment to re-discover it; contemplate it; appreciate it. You can visit the UNESCO’s International Year of Light website at www.light2015.org.

Think Outside the Bulb

The 130 year old incandescent bulb has made a monumental impact on our lives and many bulbs still linger in circulation, despite all the downsides and strong alternatives. The time for replacement of this outdated technology has arrived in full force. One of the main technologies replacing the old glowing lamps of yesterday is the compact fluorescent bulb. At the same time, we have seen light emitting diode (LED) bulbs, the next generation of technology, seeing rapid adoption.

The incandescent bulb is a point source of light with high heat and low efficiency – the entire bulb concept was built around these limitations. With the introduction of the fluorescent tube in the 1930’s – the physical requirement of a bulb wrapping a single point of light was changed to allow tubes and surfaces as lighting fixtures. These two types of light technology are commonly used for interior lighting today and require defined fixtures and arrangements. Because of the legacy of the bulb and fixture system, most new LED products are designed as bulbs and retrofits into the same form factors. Fortunately, going forward, it will be possible to create radically different styles of lighting fixtures and surfaces and break away from the dominant bulb paradigm using LED technology. The existing form factors, limited control capability and low efficiency are all previous constraints overcome with LED lighting. Once we break away from these, a whole new range of products and lighting experiences become possible.

We have only just began to tap the potential of LEDs and starting seeing interesting new lighting fixtures and lighting systems. In particular the rapid on/off cycling of LEDs as well as the small efficient package makes them ideal for custom physical sizes, wide integration into a range of products and of course, new lighting experiences such as color washes, controllable home lighting and efficient, controllable commercial lighting. It is also easier to shape the LED light into strongly focused or diffused beams, allowing a new range of lighting design. A good example is this beautiful light solution that breaks out of the old retrofit standard.

Sonneman ConnetixAnother great future following from LEDs is in surface lighting, which can range from a simple white panel to colorful interactive lighting surfaces. Many of today’s new leading products seem straight out of science fiction. Surface lighting has several benefits. It is pleasant to look at as it does not have bright hot spots that cause eye strain. Additionally, surface lighting has usages from general illumination or task lighting and can be easily blended over into ambient lighting. Surface lighting also enables places to be transformed into stunning experiences by using artistic light patterns to create a dynamic ambient lightscape.

Lellan DigitalCanvas SmartTile

Lellan DigitalCanvas SmartTile

This is a major differentiating part of next generation lighting solutions. In the past we had the bulb or ceiling light panel with two simple states: on or off. Because LED lighting allows a far better control capability and surface lighting solution can create arrangements not limited only to white lighting, they offer both a whole new opportunity and also a coming new wave of architectural and interior design. Going one step further, also using the full color light spectrum over an area allows for mood enhancement, branding experiences, and strong memorable as well as subtle new experiences of our built spaces.

One of the big impacts that interior designers have noticed is that applying color controllable surface lighting to a space seems to make it suddenly feel full of life and energy. There are endless possibilities with these new colorful surface lighting technologies.

How could you imagine using this solution in your connected home?

by Richard Wimmer

First Demo Showcase

After some preparation and with the great support of LegalForce who generously let us use there window space in Palo Alto downtown store we placed our first 4 unit demo showcase.

The demo continues to run different motion sequences and it is sitting in the prime center position of the window. Should you visit University Ave. in Palo Alto please check it out and let us know what you think.

 

SmartTile, Digital Canvas, Lellan

SmartTile, Digital Canvas, Lellan